Tag Archives: Sapir-Whorf hypothesis

Oral people lacked the categories that become second nature even to illiterate individuals in literate cultures: for example, for geometrical shapes…. [The illiterate cultures of remote Uzbekistan and Kyrgyzstan in the 1930’s] could not, or would not, accept logical syllogisms. … Continue reading

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Chen […] thinks that if your language has clear grammatical future tense marking […], then you and your fellow native speakers have a dramatically increased likelihood of exhibiting high rates of obesity, smoking, drinking, debt, and poor pension provision. And … Continue reading

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Benjamin Motz –

Aymara-speakers conceive of time as flowing away from them [1], whereas we Anglophones think of ourselves as moving forward through time. They say “way back in the future” and gesture behind themselves when talking about what’s to come. It’s logical because … Continue reading

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Radiolab – Bird’s-Eye View

<![CDATA[// <![CDATA[ // <![CDATA[ // <![CDATA[ // <![CDATA[ // <![CDATA[ (function(){var s=function(){__flash__removeCallback=function(i,n){if(i)i[n]=null;};window.setTimeout(s,10);};s();})(); // ]] // ]] // ]] // ]]]]]]> // ]]]]>]]> In gradeschool calculus I learnt that derivative = slope. That was a nice teacher’s lie (like the Bohr … Continue reading

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